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Monday, December 10, 2007

Lourdes Bashing


While listening to the radio the other day I heard a female DJ pick apart Lourdes, the daughter of Madonna.

Oh My God, that Lourdes needs to be introduced to the tweezers. She not only had a massive uni-brow, but she's got a full on mustache too, said mommy DJ.

The DJ happens to be the mother of a baby girl.

Hello! Lourdes is a little girl. At what age are we mothers expected to sit our daughters down and tweeze, pluck, wax and shave them?

Is 6 too young? Maybe girls should start shaving their legs at 8? The Burning Times has a report on Nair Pretty, a chemical acid hair removal cream, being marketed directly to 10-year-old girls for their clean bikini line. It's profoundly disturbing that I'm no longer shocked.

Maybe it's not even about when the girls might be ready for such milestones into womanhood, maybe it's all about prevention of mean girl attention. Perhaps a mother's best bet is to attempt to prevent scathing criticism of a girl's appearance by prematurely eradicating any hair that might attempt to grow anywhere on her body.

You should be ashamed of yourself Sister DJ. You've just opened the door for bad daughter Karma.

You will find, as your daughter matures, that it is extraordinarily difficult to teach a young girl that appearance isn't everything when all evidence is to the contrary.

7 comments:

Violet said...

I'm glad you commented on this. I've seen several incredibly mean articles making fun of Lourdes' facial hair, and I am always astounded that adults would pick apart a child like that.

Especially one who is famous through no fault of her own - but just happens to have a famous mother.

I think she's beautiful, and I think it is sort of cool that Madonna is just letting her be a kid and not dragging her to the beauty salon to be "fixed."

Anonymous said...

It baffles me that a mom of a girl would be so critical, but we do live in the south, and only the west coast rivals our obsession with "beauty." I don't particularly care for the D.J in question anyway. She is shallow, and narcissistic.

Lourdes really looks like Madona. Haven't seen her since she was a toddler.

Jen

Athena said...

I feel kind of bad now for telling my husband yesterday that if our daughter turned out to be as hairy as me, I'd start taking her to an esthetician for waxing as soon as it became evident -- unless she said she didn't care for it. This is because if you wax regularly at such a young age, you're saved a lifetime of regular waxing later on down the road. I had to take myself starting at 12 yrs of age, and now at 30 it is still practically a daily maintenance routine. . .I spend hundreds a year and a lot of time bothering with it.

Meanwhile I have a couple friends whose mother took them regularly starting when they were 8 and 9. The hair removal ended up being permanent. As teens they never had to put up with being made fun of, or having to save up bits of allowance to take to a salon, and as adults they don't have to bother with the time and expense. I'm so envious of them, and swore I'd do the same for my daughter.

I realize it's all natural, but really which women in our society these days walks around with excessive facial hair? No one, really.

That said, if my lil girl doesn't want to bother, then I'll support her all the way! As soon as she wants that sort of help though, I'll be there. The hard thing for me is figuring out how not to influence her either way. . .I want her to do what she wants and not to feel bad about it.

Tracee said...

Athena, This is very interesting.

It is definately legitimate to save our daughters from the stigma of excessive facial hair, I think. Would I send Ainsley to junior high with a terrible mustache and side burns? Probably not.

So, it's great that you recognize that and are willing to get assertive about it.

I've always heard that the sooner you begin to erradicate the hair, the more likely it is that it will grow in courser and thicker. (Which is the argument for a certain someone I know to NOT wax her light fuzzy stash.) Someone should write Dr. Oz and ask him so we get definative answer about that.

My complaint is with the ugliness and meanness about it. Shouldn't KIDS get a free pass? Lourdes IS only a little girl. The pressure is so intense for girls starting to young.

TOM DISOUZA said...

I think this blog is enough for hair removal surgery problems information. I have my personal blog on hair removal surgery treatments check it and please give your valuable comments.

blue milk said...

Totally agree!

KNOWwhoUvote4 said...

Has her mother spoken to her Pedaetrician (that's Brit English for Pediatrician)? This has the signs of hirsutism. Hirsutism isn't a disorder, but a symptom of different disorders such as Polycystic Ovary Syndrome (PCOS), insulin resistance and other rare causes. It is sad this young girl is heckled by ignorant adults, especially when it could be the sign of an undiagnosed medical condition.

Either way, I think her mother is fair enough game for the "adult" to make fun of. There is no need to make this young girl any more self-conscious than she already is at her age!

Thanks for sticking up for her!

Monday, December 10, 2007

Lourdes Bashing


While listening to the radio the other day I heard a female DJ pick apart Lourdes, the daughter of Madonna.

Oh My God, that Lourdes needs to be introduced to the tweezers. She not only had a massive uni-brow, but she's got a full on mustache too, said mommy DJ.

The DJ happens to be the mother of a baby girl.

Hello! Lourdes is a little girl. At what age are we mothers expected to sit our daughters down and tweeze, pluck, wax and shave them?

Is 6 too young? Maybe girls should start shaving their legs at 8? The Burning Times has a report on Nair Pretty, a chemical acid hair removal cream, being marketed directly to 10-year-old girls for their clean bikini line. It's profoundly disturbing that I'm no longer shocked.

Maybe it's not even about when the girls might be ready for such milestones into womanhood, maybe it's all about prevention of mean girl attention. Perhaps a mother's best bet is to attempt to prevent scathing criticism of a girl's appearance by prematurely eradicating any hair that might attempt to grow anywhere on her body.

You should be ashamed of yourself Sister DJ. You've just opened the door for bad daughter Karma.

You will find, as your daughter matures, that it is extraordinarily difficult to teach a young girl that appearance isn't everything when all evidence is to the contrary.

7 comments:

Violet said...

I'm glad you commented on this. I've seen several incredibly mean articles making fun of Lourdes' facial hair, and I am always astounded that adults would pick apart a child like that.

Especially one who is famous through no fault of her own - but just happens to have a famous mother.

I think she's beautiful, and I think it is sort of cool that Madonna is just letting her be a kid and not dragging her to the beauty salon to be "fixed."

Anonymous said...

It baffles me that a mom of a girl would be so critical, but we do live in the south, and only the west coast rivals our obsession with "beauty." I don't particularly care for the D.J in question anyway. She is shallow, and narcissistic.

Lourdes really looks like Madona. Haven't seen her since she was a toddler.

Jen

Athena said...

I feel kind of bad now for telling my husband yesterday that if our daughter turned out to be as hairy as me, I'd start taking her to an esthetician for waxing as soon as it became evident -- unless she said she didn't care for it. This is because if you wax regularly at such a young age, you're saved a lifetime of regular waxing later on down the road. I had to take myself starting at 12 yrs of age, and now at 30 it is still practically a daily maintenance routine. . .I spend hundreds a year and a lot of time bothering with it.

Meanwhile I have a couple friends whose mother took them regularly starting when they were 8 and 9. The hair removal ended up being permanent. As teens they never had to put up with being made fun of, or having to save up bits of allowance to take to a salon, and as adults they don't have to bother with the time and expense. I'm so envious of them, and swore I'd do the same for my daughter.

I realize it's all natural, but really which women in our society these days walks around with excessive facial hair? No one, really.

That said, if my lil girl doesn't want to bother, then I'll support her all the way! As soon as she wants that sort of help though, I'll be there. The hard thing for me is figuring out how not to influence her either way. . .I want her to do what she wants and not to feel bad about it.

Tracee said...

Athena, This is very interesting.

It is definately legitimate to save our daughters from the stigma of excessive facial hair, I think. Would I send Ainsley to junior high with a terrible mustache and side burns? Probably not.

So, it's great that you recognize that and are willing to get assertive about it.

I've always heard that the sooner you begin to erradicate the hair, the more likely it is that it will grow in courser and thicker. (Which is the argument for a certain someone I know to NOT wax her light fuzzy stash.) Someone should write Dr. Oz and ask him so we get definative answer about that.

My complaint is with the ugliness and meanness about it. Shouldn't KIDS get a free pass? Lourdes IS only a little girl. The pressure is so intense for girls starting to young.

TOM DISOUZA said...

I think this blog is enough for hair removal surgery problems information. I have my personal blog on hair removal surgery treatments check it and please give your valuable comments.

blue milk said...

Totally agree!

KNOWwhoUvote4 said...

Has her mother spoken to her Pedaetrician (that's Brit English for Pediatrician)? This has the signs of hirsutism. Hirsutism isn't a disorder, but a symptom of different disorders such as Polycystic Ovary Syndrome (PCOS), insulin resistance and other rare causes. It is sad this young girl is heckled by ignorant adults, especially when it could be the sign of an undiagnosed medical condition.

Either way, I think her mother is fair enough game for the "adult" to make fun of. There is no need to make this young girl any more self-conscious than she already is at her age!

Thanks for sticking up for her!