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Tuesday, November 11, 2008

Real Girls, Real Pressure: Dove Self Esteem Report


“Low self-esteem among girls and young women has reached a crisis level,” said Dr. Ann Kearney-Cooke, Ph.D., a psychologist and self-esteem expert who collaborated on Real Girls, Real Pressure a report on the state of girls' self-esteem sponsored by Dove's Campaign for Real Beauty.

According to the report:

* 61 percent of teen girls with low self-esteem admit to talking badly about themselves

* 67 percent of girls ages 13 – 17 turn to their mother as a resource when feeling badly about themselves compared to 91 percent of girls ages 8 – 12.

* Only 27 percent of girls ages 13 – 17 will turn to their father for help when feeling badly about themselves compared to 54 percent of girls ages 8-12.

* At 16, girls become more likely to seek support from male peers than from their own dads.

* 75 percent of girls with low self-esteem reported engaging in negative and potentially harmful activities, such as disordered eating, cutting, bullying, smoking or drinking.

* 25 percent of teen girls with low self-esteem resort to injuring themselves on purpose or cutting when feeling badly about themselves.

* 25 percent of teen girls with low self-esteem practice disordered eating, such as starving themselves, refusing to eat, or over-eating and throwing up, when feeling badly about themselves.

Real Girls, Real Pressure: A National Report on the State of Self-Esteem was conducted nationally online among 1,029 girls 8 – 17, and is representative of the U.S. based on census indicators (region, ethnicity
and parental education.) An additional 3,344 girls 8 – 17 were surveyed in a targeted study that was conducted in 20 major U.S. cities representative of each DMA based on ethnicity and parental education.
The research was conducted by StrategyOne, an applied research consulting firm, in collaboration with Ann Kearney-Cooke, PhD.

The question is: what is the cause and what is the cure for this low-self esteem in girls?

5 comments:

kaybee + rnb said...

when you come up with the answer, please share!! i thought spending time and giving praise would take care of the self esteem issue, am i wrong??? i am scared of the teen years....

Tracee said...

I'm thinking teaching them competence when it comes to their bodies might work better than mere words.

And teaching by example. Showing them how to be kind to ourselves.

Yaya said...

I love how much Dove is doing to help raise girls' self-esteems! Dove is awesome!

Michael Lee said...

I'm new here landed up searching blogs on resources on Self Esteem. cool blog you have here, keep it up. and its nice to be here. i'll be back some time later for more updates.Thanks for sharing with us....

Tracee said...

Thanks for coming by Michael Lee. come again.

Tuesday, November 11, 2008

Real Girls, Real Pressure: Dove Self Esteem Report


“Low self-esteem among girls and young women has reached a crisis level,” said Dr. Ann Kearney-Cooke, Ph.D., a psychologist and self-esteem expert who collaborated on Real Girls, Real Pressure a report on the state of girls' self-esteem sponsored by Dove's Campaign for Real Beauty.

According to the report:

* 61 percent of teen girls with low self-esteem admit to talking badly about themselves

* 67 percent of girls ages 13 – 17 turn to their mother as a resource when feeling badly about themselves compared to 91 percent of girls ages 8 – 12.

* Only 27 percent of girls ages 13 – 17 will turn to their father for help when feeling badly about themselves compared to 54 percent of girls ages 8-12.

* At 16, girls become more likely to seek support from male peers than from their own dads.

* 75 percent of girls with low self-esteem reported engaging in negative and potentially harmful activities, such as disordered eating, cutting, bullying, smoking or drinking.

* 25 percent of teen girls with low self-esteem resort to injuring themselves on purpose or cutting when feeling badly about themselves.

* 25 percent of teen girls with low self-esteem practice disordered eating, such as starving themselves, refusing to eat, or over-eating and throwing up, when feeling badly about themselves.

Real Girls, Real Pressure: A National Report on the State of Self-Esteem was conducted nationally online among 1,029 girls 8 – 17, and is representative of the U.S. based on census indicators (region, ethnicity
and parental education.) An additional 3,344 girls 8 – 17 were surveyed in a targeted study that was conducted in 20 major U.S. cities representative of each DMA based on ethnicity and parental education.
The research was conducted by StrategyOne, an applied research consulting firm, in collaboration with Ann Kearney-Cooke, PhD.

The question is: what is the cause and what is the cure for this low-self esteem in girls?

5 comments:

kaybee + rnb said...

when you come up with the answer, please share!! i thought spending time and giving praise would take care of the self esteem issue, am i wrong??? i am scared of the teen years....

Tracee said...

I'm thinking teaching them competence when it comes to their bodies might work better than mere words.

And teaching by example. Showing them how to be kind to ourselves.

Yaya said...

I love how much Dove is doing to help raise girls' self-esteems! Dove is awesome!

Michael Lee said...

I'm new here landed up searching blogs on resources on Self Esteem. cool blog you have here, keep it up. and its nice to be here. i'll be back some time later for more updates.Thanks for sharing with us....

Tracee said...

Thanks for coming by Michael Lee. come again.